Burn Permits

Do I need a Residential Burn Permit?

If you plan to burn vegetative debris on your property between the months of May 1 and November 30, you will need to obtain a burn permit.  El Dorado Hills residents can obtain a burn permit from any one of our four fire station.  For piles 4 feet x 4 feet or less, you need a State burn permit from May 1st through the end of Fire Season, which you can obtain from your local fire station.  The process is very simple and will only take about 5 minutes.  Burn permits are good for three years.

 

If you are burning material in a pile GREATER in size than 4 feet x 4 feet, you MUST obtain a Burn Permit from El Dorado County Air Quality Management District (AQMD):

El Dorado County Air Quality Management District
330 Fair Lane
Placerville, CA 95667
(530) 621-6662

 

When can I burn?

All burning must take place on a designated Burn Day.  Please call (530) 621-5897 or toll free (866) 621-5897 immediately prior to igniting your pile for Burn Day status.

 

What material can I legally burn?

Residential burning is limited to tree trimmings, vines, brush, leaves, lawn clippings and dry plants collected from the property on which you are burning.

DO NOT BURN stumps or poison oak.

 

What is ILLEGAL to burn?

Household garbage such as paper, junk mail, cardboard, cans, glass, furniture, plastics, rubber, tires, tar paper, asphalt shingles, dimensioned lumber, treated lumber, insulation, caulking tubes, paints or coatings, metal wire, or other miscellaneous construction and demolition debris, are SOME of the materials that are illegal to burn.  These items produce toxic pollutants that may cause cancer, immune system damage, and other health problems.

ALL BURN BARRELS HAVE BEEN BANNED

 

How should I burn my material?

Prior to burning, vegetative material must be dry and reasonably free of dirt.  Burn piles should be constructed in such a way as to allow fresh air intake to promote more efficient burning for reduced smoke generation.  *Only material that will burn in 24 hours can be ignited.  If your pile is wet, let it dry for a few days before burning.  Avoid causing a smoke nuisance for your neighbors.

 

Are YOU doing the right thing the wrong way?

While trying to eliminate the fire hazards around your home, are you in the process starting a wildland fire?

When grass dries out in the heat of summer, wildfires start easily. Whether working to create a defensible space around your home, mowing the lawn, or pulling your dirt bike over to the side of the road, you need to use all equipment responsibly.

A simple spark caused by a lawn mower blade, a weedeater wire leader striking a rock, high temperatures from mufflers, or faulty spark arresters on yard equipment are enough to ignite dry grass. Restrict lawn mowing and equipment use to cooler morning hours when lower temperatures and higher humidity reduce the risk of starting a wildfire.  Do your part the right way to keep your community fire safe!

                                

IMPORTANT

The following are burning permit terms for burning debris in small 4'x 4' pile:

  • Maximum pile size 4 foot in diameter.
  • Area within 10 feet of the outer edge of pile is maintained free and clear of all flammable material and vegetation.
  • Responsible person in attendance with shovel until fire is dead out.
  • Water supply at burning site.
  • No burning shall be undertaken unless weather conditions (particularly wind) are such that burning can be considered safe.
  • Additional terms and conditions.

VIOLATIONS OF ANY BURNING PERMIT TERMS ARE A VIOLATION OF STATE LAW

(PUBLIC RESOURCES CODE 4421, 4422, 4423 AND 4425)

Health & Safety Code 13009 states that persons who lose control of a permitted burn may be liable for suppression costs.

If you have any questions about backyard burning, please email our This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..